Photograph of a young parent sitting on the floor next to their baby, who is holding a toy
Call for Papers
Research on Expectant and Parenting Youth in Foster Care

The Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (CASWJ) invites submissions for a special issue devoted to research on expectant and parenting youth in foster care.

Image is a headshot of Claudette Grinnell-Davis, set inside the four corners of the ReSHAPING logo.

Claudette GrinneLl-Davis, PhD, MS, MSW

Image is a headshot of Bryn King, set inside the four corners of the ReSHAPING logo.

Bryn King, PhD, MSW

Image is a headshot of Svetlana Shpiegel, set inside the four corners of the ReSHAPING logo.

Svetlana Shpiegel, PhD, MSW

Image is a headshot of Rhoda Smith, set inside the four corners of the ReSHAPING logo.

Rhoda Smith, PhD, MSW

March 17, 2021

The Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (CASWJ) invites submissions for a special issue devoted to research on expectant and parenting youth in foster care.

Existing research shows that youth who have spent time in foster care exhibit higher rates of early pregnancy and parenthood than their peers in the general youth population. The risk of becoming pregnant and giving birth or fathering a child is particularly high during late adolescence and early adulthood, as youth transition from life in the child welfare system to living on their own.

Young parenthood presents opportunities for growth, building community, and enhancing young peoples’ capacity for resiliency in the face of complex and multi-dimensional challenges.

Early parenthood has been linked to a range of adverse outcomes for the young parents and their children, such as educational and vocational difficulties, decreased financial self-sufficiency, and increased risk of intergenerational child maltreatment and child welfare system involvement.

At the same time, it presents opportunities for growth, building community, and enhancing young peoples’ capacity for resiliency in the face of complex and multi-dimensional challenges.

This special issue will feature empirical articles that address the predictors, experiences, context, and outcomes of early pregnancy and parenthood among young people who have spent time in foster care.

We are interested in quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies, as well as scoping or systematic reviews and meta-analyses that offer theoretical and empirical insights into pregnancy and parenthood among youth with foster care backgrounds.

Studies should have clearly defined implications for research and practice or policy.

We welcome papers from a variety of fields, including but not limited to public health, nursing, social work, prevention science, psychology, psychiatry, biology, criminology, and education. We also welcome papers from child welfare contexts outside North America.

Guest Editors

This special issue will be guest edited by Claudette Grinnell-Davis, School of Social Work, University of Oklahoma, USA; Bryn King, School of Social Work, University of Toronto, Canada; Svetlana Shpiegel, Department of Social Work and Child Advocacy, Montclair State University, USA; and Rhoda Smith, Department of Graduate Social Work, Springfield College, USA.

Journal Information

Now in its 37th year of publication, CASWJ is published six times a year. Initial decisions are typically provided within six weeks from submission. Accepted articles appear online within two months and in print within six months. The journal is indexed in Journal Citation Reports and has an impact factor of 1.156 (2019). The special issue encourages co-authorship that includes researchers and persons from other fields, including service providers, educators, coaches, policy makers, health care practitioners, etc.

Submission Information

Email manuscript submissions directly to Dr. Claudette Grinnell-Davis. Papers should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document and formatted according to the 7th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).

For any questions regarding this special issue, please contact Dr. Claudette Grinnell-Davis or Dr. Svetlana Shpiegel.

Deadline

The deadline for submission of papers for possible inclusion in this special issue is June 1, 2021. 

Claudette Grinnell-Davis is an assistant professor in the Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work at the University of Oklahoma. Her research interests in child welfare prevention and the etiology of child maltreatment grew out of her practice experience as a family reunification specialist, where she realized that the services parents received while separated from their children did not correspond well to the underlying reasons for removal from care. Operating from a clinical ecosystems framework, she maintains that multiple risk factors and pathways into child welfare system involvement requires a constellation of interventions available for best results; the primary problem then becomes identifying and prioritizing intervention targets. She is also particularly interested on how to improve child welfare outcomes for Native American parents and how historical trauma influences maladaptive parenting practices. Dr. Grinnell-Davis is a non-status descendant of Anishinaabeg peoples of the Canadian Great Lakes region and identifies culturally as Indigenous. Read more.

Dr. King is an Assistant Professor at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, and an affiliated researcher at both the Children’s Data Network, University of Southern California and the California Child Welfare Indicators Project, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. King has over 16 years of clinical experience in a variety of settings, but much of her practice has worked towards addressing the behavioral health impacts of maltreatment and violence among children, adolescents, and adults. At the broadest level, her research examines the epidemiology, service involvement, and outcomes of children and youth who are maltreated and come to the attention of the child protective system in North America. Read more.

Svetlana Shpiegel is an Associate Professor at the Department of Social Work and Child Advocacy, Montclair State University. Her research focuses on the functioning of adolescents and young adults emancipating from the foster care system. She is particularly interested in early pregnancy and parenthood among current and former foster youth, and the effects of parenthood on their socioeconomic outcomes. She has expertise working with large administrative datasets, such as the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD), the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), and the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). Read more.

Rhoda Smith received her Bachelor of Psychology from California State University – Fullerton, MSW from the University of Southern California, and her PhD from Loma Linda University. She has 25 years of child welfare experience in California, ranging from child welfare social worker to child welfare training site director. As a social worker with lived experience as a teen mother and foster alum, she is committed to making an impact in the policy arena for foster youth. She plans to continue research which highlights wellbeing issues for foster youth transitioning from the system while navigating the challenges of parenthood. Read more.